WCCC Player Games

 

Club Member Games

The following are links to club member games that players have provided.  To provide a game, please e-mail either a link to the game if you have already loaded it to a chess site or the pgn file to Bob Flanagan, bobflanagan1@gmail.com.  If you want, send a screen shot of your pgn sheet and Bob (time permitting) will load. Lastly, include a short description of the game and any comments on the game to help attract viewers :D.

Club members can use www.chesspractice.com to load games.  Club members do not have to pay for use of www.chesspractice.com.  Simply create an account and let Bob know. He will provide an extension code to extend your free use of the site.  If you have an account on the site, simply click on the link on left titled "Add a game or position" to add your game.  After you create the game and save, email the link to the game to Bob.

Another way to create a pgn is to use the Pgn Maker at Cassia.com.  This lets you creates a pgn that you can copy to the clipboard and then email to Bob. 

Two ways to view the games are provided:  A link to the game at chesspractice.com and a link to the game at lichess.org. 

A key difference between chesspractice.com and lichess.org is how the best move is displayed:  At lichess.org, the best move is shown before one moves.  At chesspractice.com, the best move is shown after one moves.  Thus if you want to see if you can figure out the best move without being told what it is beforehand, review the game at chesspractice.com :). 

Jan 30:  Denis Markov vs Nate Bryans, Result: 1-0

Both players maneuvered excellently with no one consolidating a decisive advantage until nearly 40 moves into the match when time was getting low. Afterward, Nate and Denis discussed their preparation as they analyzed what happened on the board. It was fascinating to hear how much of the game takes place before the first move is played. In this case, Denis dusted off the Queen’s Gambit, which he rarely includes in his opening repertoire, taking Nate by surprise. Enjoy the game in its entirety and check out an especially intriguing tactical position from the match below!

  1. View the game at www.chesspractice.com
  2. View the game at wwww.lichess.org

Jan 18: Kyle Hopkins (1393) vs Ethan Hinson (1508), Result 0-1

The opening was a Slav defense where each player fianchettoed their king’s bishops. After Ethan made some positional inaccuracies, Kyle was able to build up significant pressure that made it difficult for Ethan to find the right moves (despite the position being deemed ‘equal’ by engine standards). Eventually, Ethan succumbed to the pressure and almost got his queen trapped, but he saved the position with a dubious tactic that involved a queen sac to win the exchange.
After the dust settled, Kyle still had some counter play in the form of a passed pawn on the 7th rank, but Ethan kept the position locked and slowly converted the endgame into a concretely winning position, at which point Kyle ended up resigning.

 

Jan 18: Preston Laden (1883) vs Bob Flanagan (1526),  Result: 0-1

The opening in this game was a very tactical opening with neither player getting a significant advantage.  In the early middle game, the computer found a sacrifice move Preston could have done and gotten a significant advantage.  But few humans would have seen the move :).  In the late middle game, Bob found an attack on both the undefended advanced d pawn and the b pawn, resulting in Bob gaining a pawn.  The end game had both with queens and Bob up a pawn and about to take another when Preston ran out of time.

Jan 11: Mel Ross (1773) vs Richard Neal (1600).  Result: 1-0

In this game, Mel opened with 1. e4, the King pawn opening.  Richard replied with 1... g6, the Modern defense.  Mel's response was the three pawns attack (pawns at d4, e4 and f4).

Jan 11: Bob Flanagan (1487) vs Joe Mucerino (2006).  Results: 1/2-1/2

Bob opened the game with the English Opening.  The first several moves were the most likely book moves.  Then Bob chose to go off book and offer a queen exchange in hopes of moving the game into uncharted territory and getting back the pawn loss he incurred caused by the exchange of queens and loss of castling rights.  Both players had chances to win!

Jan 11: Ian Millstein (1672) vs Brian McDermott (1569). Results 1-0

This game has a very interesting end game.  Brian ended up with a queen vs Ian's rook and bishop and several passed pawns.  Both players had ways to win or draw the game.